Monday, 30 March 2020

Astronomy in Yorkshire #4 March 30th 1868 Edward Crossley and Linne Crater

Astronomy in Yorkshire #4 March 30th 1868 Edward Crossley and Linne Crater

In the 19th century there was a major argument among astronomers that there had been changes observed in a crater on the Moon called the Linne Crater. Today we know that no major  changes have happened to the crater in modern times. Here is just one of the many astronomers who looked at the Linne Crater.

Edward Crossley whose family owned Crossley carpets in Halifax was also a very keen amateur astronomer and on March 30th 1868.

Crossley viewed Linne with his 9.3 inch Thomes Cooke telescope. He could see it as a small crater in the Mare Serenitatis, or Sea of Serenity, in the middle ages when astronomers without telescopes drew pictures of the Moon they thought the dark areas were seas, after all we have seas on Earth, the language they used was Latin. There are no real seas on the Moon but we still use these old names.

Crossley thought it was about 1 mile wide appeared circular but had badly defined edges. He had observed this crater in October 1867 and there appeared to be no changes.

The Crossley 9.3 inch Cooke 

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